Las Vegas Sun

October 25, 2014

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The Sun’s 2014 election endorsements
The Sun offers its endorsements of candidates and makes recommendations on the ballot questions for this year’s election. All terms are four years unless otherwise noted.
Endorsements on the judges
Voters this year have several judicial elections to consider. These can be difficult choices for voters because as a rule, the public doesn’t track judicial decisions and legal issues, so voters can be hard-pressed in knowing who the best judges are. Let us help you. Here are the Sun’s endorsements for District and Family Court races in Clark County.

Columnists »

Where I Stand »

Letters to the Editor

E-mail your submission. Letters to the editor should be no more than 250 words and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

Midterm elections to stun Democrats
With less than two weeks until the midterm elections, it’s not looking good for the home team — President Barack Obama and the Democrats. Why? The Islamic State is on the rise — strike one. Ebola is spreading — strike two. The stock market is tanking — strike three.
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By Carmine A. DiFazio, North Las Vegas
Cowards won’t show their faces
Well, they are at it again. How exciting it must have been for the brave Hamas warriors fighting while hiding behind the women and children of Gaza.
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By Bruce Karley, Las Vegas
Conservation is our water solution
We have been living with drought in the Southwest for years, so long that many of us are tuning it out.
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By Daniel R. Patterson, Boulder City
Ideology of the Dark Ages
I am responding to the Oct. 11 column “Incomplete caricature of Islam” by Nicholas Kristof, a columnist for The New York Times.
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By Bill Fennell, Las Vegas
Oncologists against margin tax
On behalf of the Nevada Oncology Society, I want to express my concern with the statewide Ballot Question 3, referred to as “The Margin Tax Initiative” or “The Education Initiative.” Nevada Oncology Society is a nonprofit organization representing medical oncologists, surgical oncologists and other oncology specialists who provide cancer care in Nevada.
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By Hamidreza Sanatinia, Rockville, Md.
Media can best protect reporters
In response to Caroline Little’s Other Voices of Oct. 10 (“It’s time to protect journalists who risk their lives to report the news”), the media themselves have the means by which to best protect journalists operating in war zones.
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By Graham H. Tye, North Las Vegas
Who will Cegavske represent?
I viewed with interest the article on the secretary of state race in the Oct. 12 issue of the Sun. One important overlooked fact is that candidate Barbara Cegavske serves on the board of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and is state chair for that organization.
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By Gil Eisner, Las Vegas
Memorial walls for exposed employees
After coming home tonight from a local casino with the stench of nicotine clinging to me, I have come up with an idea for casinos that refuse to change to a nonsmoking environment for the safety of their patrons and, more importantly, their employees.
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By Sandra Hanson, Las Vegas
No reasonable alternative offered
Millions of dollars are being spent to influence Nevada voters on the education initiative. Intelligent people can disagree on issues like taxes and education spending, but some things are facts.
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By Jeremy Christensen, Las Vegas
Ulterior motives for blaming police
I must say I found the behavior of always blaming the police and taking the side of criminals a bit curious, but finally the pattern has emerged and it has become crystal clear.
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By David Baker, Las Vegas

Other Voices »

  • A world without OPEC?
    Forty-one years ago this month, the Arab oil embargo began. The countries that were part of it belonged, of course, to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries — OPEC — which had banded together 13 years earlier to strengthen their ability to negotiate with international oil companies. The embargo led to widespread shortages in the United States, higher prices at the gas pump and long lines at gas stations. By the time it ended, the price of oil had risen to $12 a barrel from $3.
  • The blue-collar imperative
    In Georgia, Democrat Michelle Nunn is giving Republicans a real scare in a Senate race the GOP thought it had put away. Some of her new momentum comes from a sustained attack on David Perdue, her businessman foe, for his work shipping American jobs overseas.
  • A generation without chores
    I recently moderated a talk for a colleague who was addressing a large group of parents. She asked me to hand out a time wheel, which listed a variety of activities that could make up a typical day in the life of a kid today. She instructed parents to spend a few minutes thinking about how much time their kids spend on each category, then shout out estimates as we made our way around the time wheel.
  • An affair to remember, differently
    We live in a world awash in unreliable narrators. Officials at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital were unreliable narrators on Ebola. The Internet is bristling with unreliable narrators who prefer their takes to the truth.
  • Potlatch for politicians
    An editor with multiple graduate degrees once called me with a story idea hatched among fellow trend-sniffers in New York.
  • Who can afford kids nowadays?
    Parenthood should be affordable in this country, but the cost of raising a child from birth to adulthood is now a quarter of a million dollars and projected to double by the time today’s toddlers reach their teens. Will having kids soon be out of reach economically for many American families?
  • Sen. Warren makes the case
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she isn’t running for president. At this rate, however, she may have to.
  • What energy crisis?
    There is something extraordinary happening on Main Street, in the suburban strips and at country stores: Workers are lowering the prices on the signs for gasoline.
  • How to restart health care reform
    Midterm elections are coming, and both parties are lobbing grenades about health care. Despite the furious rhetoric, the two sides are more alike than they realize. Both spent decades pursuing policies that obstruct health care’s capacity to save lives, ease suffering and cut costs. The endless vitriol resembles World War I-style trench warfare. The 2010 Affordable Care Act moved the battle lines a little in one direction; the midterms that year moved them a little in the opposite direction. With divided government, the 2014 elections will move the lines even less.
  • No faith in our government
    I promised myself I wouldn’t do it, but I did: While flying from D.C. to Dallas recently, just after the news came out that an Ebola-infected nurse had been allowed to fly while running a fever, I went back and read the opening pages of Stephen King’s “The Stand.”
  • Hearing, listening and marriage
    Here’s what I’ve learned in 23 years of marriage: Love isn’t blind, but it can be hard of hearing.
  • As aggression rises, it’s time to examine policing
    Today, electronic eyes are everywhere, and the once-submerged issue of encounters between police and black men is coming into public view. It’s creating increasing tensions between blacks — regardless of their income and professional status — and police who have muscled up to fight everything from seat-belt violations to terrorism.
  • Should Israel withdraw from West Bank?
    Sixty years ago Algerians revolted against the French who had ruled them for more than 120 years. On Nov. 1, 1954, the National Liberation Front (FLN), the leading Algerian underground, issued a proclamation calling upon the French government to enter negotiations, which eventually would lead to the creation of an independent Algeria.
  • Failures of competence
    For years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been the most trusted agency in the federal government. The CDC has seen the country through SARS and the swine flu virus. The general perception was not only did it do important, apolitical work, but it was highly competent. And then came Ebola.
  • No shock and no awe
    It’s not too soon to state the obvious: At this point, the war against the Islamic State can only be seen as failing.