Las Vegas Sun

November 21, 2014

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Editorials »

Voters want to see GOP’s vision
Gov. Brian Sandoval rode a Republican surge in his re-election bid Tuesday, one that swept not only through Nevada but also throughout the nation.
Give the dying the right to pick how and when they want to die
Data from the Oregon Public Health Division show that between 1997 and 2013, 1,173 terminally ill patients received prescriptions for life-ending medication and only 752 of them decided to use the medication. Another 31 people may have taken the medication, but the information wasn’t reported to the state. California may be the first, thanks to Brittany Maynard.
Letters to the Editor

E-mail your submission. Letters to the editor should be no more than 250 words and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

Vote for your interests, not pols’
How is it politicians, Republican and Democrat, are able to get voters to either not vote or vote against their best interests? The last national election turnout was …
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By Richard Rychtarik, Las Vegas
GOP majority will expose hypocrites
I was glad to see the Republican Party take the Senate and keep the House and governorships. This is the last hurrah for their party, and the public will finally see …
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By Michelle Bracey, Henderson
A look at what left voters dissatisfied
Since voters on Nov. 4 said their votes were votes against President Barack Obama, that means they are dissatisfied with …
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By Randall Buie, Henderson
Think about securing savings
The rich have taken control of the House and Senate, and if you are middle class, you may want to start putting your savings in a secured hold. I say this because …
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By Don Ellis, Henderson
Republic Services losing recyclables
n regards to the letter “Republic Services needs a better plan” (Nov. 12) …
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By John Walsh, Las Vegas
Traffic stops are fattening coffers
I see Northtown is stopping all vehicles “to see if they are properly belted.” Sure. Northtown is short of money, and what better way to …
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By Wayne Brotherton Sr., Amargosa Valley
Use American-made material
I think it is about time the city, county and state governments pass laws prohibiting the use of equipment and/or supplies not manufactured in America for construction of any project in which …
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By Leonard Herscovitch, Las Vegas
Reid can make Yucca help Nevada
Amber Phillips’ story “What the GOP’s big win means for Yucca” (Nov. 10) mentioned the possibility of restarting the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste project now that Harry Reid will no longer be able to block it. Phillips indicated that …
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By Tom Keller, Henderson
Soccer stadium isn’t a priority
Soccer! Who’s going to go see a soccer game? I’ll go to a football game or baseball game, but soccer …
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By Charles Berberian, Las Vegas
Ambrose should look at history
As a historian and history teacher, I take issue many conclusions made in Jay Ambrose’s column …
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By Greg Grant, Las Vegas

Other Voices »

  • What happened to American isolationism? Two beheadings, for starters
    Remember when pundits were worried Americans had turned isolationist? As recently as August, polls showed big majorities opposed to military intervention in Iraq, Syria or anywhere else. But it only took a couple of …
  • On Cosby, hard to keep the faith
    On Cosby, hard to keep the faith
    A few weeks ago, I spent a delightful afternoon and evening with Bill Cosby. I was the emcee of a gala for historically black Claflin University, which is in my hometown; Cosby was the headliner. Both of us were …
  • Politicians, teens and birth control
    Here’s a story of utter irresponsibility: About one-third of American girls become pregnant as teenagers. But it’s not just a story of heedless girls and boys who don’t take precautions. This is also a tale of …
  • Don’t ask how to feed the 9 billion
    At dinner with a friend the other night, I mentioned I was giving a talk debunking the idea that we need to grow more food on a large scale so we can “feed the 9 billion” — the anticipated global population by 2050. She looked at me, horrified, and said, “But how are you going to produce enough food to feed the hungry?” I suggested she try this exercise ...
  • Rethinking the United States’ foreign policy
    President Barack Obama’s coming request for Congress to “right-size and update” the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) against terrorism will be constitutionally fastidious and will catalyze a debate that will illuminate Republican fissures. They, however, are signs of a healthy development — the reappearance of foreign policy heterodoxy in Republican ranks.
  • The fable of Kentucky’s Sen. Rand Paul
    “The most interesting man in politics” is what Politico Magazine crowned Rand Paul in September, when it placed him at the top of a list of 50 people to keep an eye on. And Time magazine used those exact six words, in that exact order, next to a photograph of Paul on its cover last month. The adjective bears notice. Interesting. Not powerful. Not popular. Not even influential. They’re saying that he’s a great character. And that’s not the same as a great candidate.
  • Will President Barack Obama’s final two years be a sprint on regulation?
    Will President Barack Obama’s final two years be a sprint on regulation?
    The election results were a crushing political blow for the Obama administration, giving Republicans firm control of both houses of Congress for the final two years of his term. But this in no way signals the end of …
  • History gives clues to Roberts’ thinking on new Obamacare case
    The Supreme Court’s surprising decision recently to hear a new challenge to the Affordable Care Act has once again focused attention on Chief Justice John Roberts, who cast the deciding vote in a 2012 decision that saved Obamacare from being declared unconstitutional. Many court watchers expect he will …
  • An accord the planet needed
    he minute we glimpse a flicker of hope in the fight against climate change, Republicans in Congress announce …
  • Don’t govern on fantasies
    When high-mindedness collides with reality, reality usually wins. Remember this when you hear talk of making the next …
  • Makers and breakers
    Flip through any newspaper, go from the foreign news to the business pages and what you’ll see is the “other” great geopolitical struggle in the world today. It’s not the traditional one between nation states on land. It’s the struggle between …
  • Democrats need more diversity, too
    Here we go again. Big election defeats inevitably are followed by major rounds of teeth-gnashing, shirt-rending, soul-searching, finger pointing, self-flagellating and circular firing squad shooting. Now it’s the …
  • Always look on the bright side
    The polling places hadn’t even opened before the Senate’s right-wing firebrand, Ted Cruz, was demanding …
  • Big money wins again in a romp
    The day after the midterm elections, I met up with a man named Ira Glasser, the former longtime head of the American Civil Liberties Union. For days, the media had been full of news about the enormous sums of money likely to be spent by special-interest groups and others to influence the outcome of Senate races, House races, gubernatorial races — even judicial races. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, which issued a report just days before the midterms, nearly $4 billion was expected to be spent, in toto, on the midterms. Glasser had no problem with any of ...
  • World powers are forming alliances again, as they did before WWI
    At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, the Great War was over. But the “War to End All Wars” famously didn’t live up to its billing. Still, it had greater impact on the world than any event of the past thousand years. The question is whether another such war might be looming today.