Las Vegas Sun

April 18, 2014

Currently: 80° — Complete forecast | Log in | Create an account

Opinion

Editorials »

Championing transparency
Open government is good government, and it starts with elections
Secretary of State Ross Miller has found himself oddly under fire for aggressively upholding campaign disclosure laws, odd because some of his critics are self-professed champions of government transparency.
Court deals a blow to free speech
Justices’ ruling sends the message that the rich have a greater right to speech than the rest of us
Many conservatives cheered the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling this past week that struck down part of a campaign finance law, claiming it was a “victory” for free speech.

Columnists »

Where I Stand »

Letters to the Editor

E-mail your submission. Letters to the editor should be no more than 250 words and include the writer’s name, address and telephone number. Anonymous letters will not be printed.

President wrong on GOP and voting
In a speech April 11, President Barack Obama spent a good part of the time chastising Republicans for limiting voting access to millions of blacks and minorities.
Continues…
By Clarence Lanzrath, Las Vegas
We lie to our kids about marijuana
I’m writing about Jackie Valley’s story in The Sunday: “Modern addiction: Our heroin epidemic.”
Continues…
By Kirk Muse, Mesa, Ariz.
Lawmakers get paid to do nothing
Well, here we go again. After all the hard work it did, the House is in recess. Lawmakers can go back to their gerrymandered districts and collect money to get re-elected to go back to Washington and do more nothing.
Continues…
By Bruce Karley, Las Vegas
Bundy’s win sends the wrong message
It is time for Nevada to man up and uphold the laws of the land. Since when did America start negotiating with terrorists? Cliven Bundy has blatantly broken the law and, even in the face of compromise, could not show humility or respect.
Continues…
By Greta Hyland, Dammeron Valley, Utah
Bundy, supporters make us look bad
I hope I’m not the only Nevada resident sickened by the fact that federal officials caved in to Cliven Bundy and his band of well-armed supporters.
Continues…
By Terry Cox, Henderson
Putting an end to incivility
I am disgusted and embarrassed by the shoe-throwing incident aimed at former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. I hope the protester is prosecuted, imprisoned or at least heavily fined.
Continues…
By Delores France, North Las Vegas
Other landowners could use support
I have a curiosity about the Bundy supporters. They were calling out for his rights to have his cattle graze on public land without paying for it.
Continues…
By Rodney Iverson, Las Vegas
Mr. Bundy, please stay off my land
When my mother retired and moved to New Mexico a number of years ago, she came in contact with a number of boastful cattle ranchers. She quickly realized that the easiest way to deflate them was to ask: “And exactly how much of the land that you use do you own?” Big hat, big cattle, almost no land.
Continues…
By Richard Small, Las Vegas
A double standard at play over Bundy?
Very interesting are the many stories in both the electronic and print medias about rancher Cliven Bundy.
Continues…
Jack Corrick, Boulder City
Let’s not paint over Bush’s legacy
I see George W. Bush is now painting pictures of famous people.
Continues…
Carl Heck, Aspen, Colo.

Other Voices »

  • Our soldiers don’t deserve to return to this
    The only reason he is alive, Mike Yurchison says, is his girlfriend, Leigh Anna Landsberger. She sits with him through endless waits at Veterans Affairs, whispering that he’s smarter than she is even if his brain is damaged. She helps him through his seizures, and she nags him to overcome drug addiction.
  • Women’s unequal lot in life
    I dropped in on my sister last week. As usual, I was amazed. I work a single job; she works three or four. There’s her paid one at an executive search firm, finding and screening candidates for corner offices in the retail industry. Then there are the others.
  • Israelites and a long obedience
    Monday night was the start of Passover, the period when Jews celebrate the liberation of the Israelites from slavery into freedom.
  • Has GM pulled a Pinto?
    In the late 1960s, a charismatic vice president at Ford Motor Co. decided to bring out a low-priced car that could be produced for little money while bringing in huge profits. The executive’s name was Lee Iacocca, and the Ford Pinto he championed became one of the most infamous models in U.S. automotive history. Why? Because to save money, Ford released a car that could explode in even low-speed rear-end collisions.
  • Go ahead, Vladimir, make my day
    So the latest news is that President Vladimir Putin of Russia has threatened to turn off gas supplies to Ukraine if Kiev doesn’t pay its overdue bill, and, by the way, Ukraine’s pipelines are the transit route for 15 percent of gas consumption for Europe. If I’m actually rooting for Putin to go ahead and shut off the gas, does that make me a bad guy?
  • The oldest hatred, forever young
    Most of the hate crimes in the United States don’t take the fatal form that the shootings in Kansas over the weekend did, and most aren’t perpetrated by villains as bloated with rage and blinded by conspiracy theories as the person accused in this case, Frazier Glenn Miller. He’s an extreme, not an emblem.
  • CEO pay goes up, up and away!
    At 79, Graef “Bud” Crystal is the grand old man of executive compensation critics. Once a top compensation consultant, he switched sides in the 1980s, becoming a fierce critic of many of the practices he helped institutionalize and analyzing executive pay for other media such as Fortune and, most recently, Bloomberg News. He’s been known to call his second career “atoning for my sins.”
  • The boundaries of Boston Strong
    The 118th Boston Marathon, next week, will actually be the first of its kind — the first running of the iconic American foot race after two bombers killed three people, injured 263 (many horribly) and shook the nation a year ago.
  • Diversity and dishonesty
    Earlier this year, a column by a Harvard undergraduate named Sandra Y.L. Korn briefly achieved escape velocity from the Ivy League bubble, thanks to its daring view of how universities should approach academic freedom.
  • Poverty not just about race
    Why does so much of our talk about race and poverty leave us Americans spinning our wheels? One big reason is etiquette. What is said often matters less than who says it.
  • All in the family, sort of
    Here’s the latest life lesson from the campaign trail: If you are, say, making a home movie about how great your family is, try to remember to use pictures of your actual relatives and not random attractive strangers.
  • While America moves forward, Iowa Republicans step backward
    As stealthily as it reared its ugly head, the power to harness prejudice against gay people to win national elections is shriveling up and dying a well-deserved death.
  • Has Obamacare become too big to fail?
    When Obamacare’s first open-enrollment period ended recently, the tally was impressive: 7.1 million Americans signed up for insurance on federal and state exchanges by the March 31 deadline, several million more signed up for Medicaid and a whole lot of younger-than-26 Americans got covered by their parents’ plans.
  • Does that baby bird need help? Interfering can actually hurt
    As surely as April showers bring May flowers, spring brings baby animals. Chicks are hatching, rabbits are digging dens and fawns are meandering through meadows, so chances are good that many of us will encounter young wildlife. It can be difficult to resist the temptation to scoop up a vulnerable-looking fledgling bird or squirrel pup, but well-meaning people often hurt — rather than help — animals’ chances for survival by “rescuing” baby animals who are perfectly fine and whose parents are foraging for food nearby.
  • Hearing from the Greatest Generation
    I have spent a lifetime reading the comments of readers of the Las Vegas Sun and, more recently, our new weekly publication, The Sunday. For the most part, those who comment on stories and columns are thoughtful and sincere. It matters not whether I agree with what they say, only that they are respectful and considerate of the ideas of others.