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August 23, 2014

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Rancher discusses his feud with BLM on Glenn Beck show

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STEVE MARCUS

Cliven Bundy, right, talks with militia-type volunteers at the family ranch near Bunkerville Sunday, April 13, 2014. Volunteers include Scott Woods, left, of West Virginia, Christian Yingling, center, of Pennsylvania, and Jay LeDuc, background right, of Payson, Ariz.

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This Nov. 20, 2011, file photo shows TV and radio commentator Glenn Beck at the 114th Anniversary Justice Louis Brandeis award Dinner given by the Zionist Organization of America in New York.

Future Uncertain in Bundy-BLM Dispute

Cliven Bundy, right, talks with militia-type volunteers at the family ranch near Bunkerville Sunday, April 13, 2014. Volunteers include Scott Woods, left, of West Virginia, Christian Yingling, center, of Pennsylvania, and Jay LeDuc, background right, of Payson, Ariz. Launch slideshow »

Ranch owner Cliven Bundy’s feud with the Bureau of Land Management has caught the attention of national radio host Glenn Beck.

Bundy, who lives near Bunkerville, was on Beck’s radio show this morning to discuss his beef with the Bureau of Land Management, which has accused him of failing to pay the required fees to graze his cattle on federal land.

That prompted the BLM to start rounding up the cattle, an operation abruptly canceled Saturday amid escalating tensions between federal agents and Bundy supporters, including armed members of various militia groups.

During today’s radio interview, Bundy challenged county sheriffs across the country to disarm federal authorities.

“We the people took into their own hands to do the sheriff’s job and the governor of Nevada’s job,” Bundy said.

Bundy talked to Beck for about 25 minutes, touching on his interpretation of the U.S. Constitution, the role of militiamen in escalating tensions and his stand against the BLM.

Bundy said he stopped paying grazing fees because he believes the land is owned by the state and that he has a right to use it for his cattle.

When challenged about why he stopped paying, Bundy said he attempted to pay what he considers the proper authorities — not the BLM.

The fight, Bundy said, has become more than just about cattle.

“I feel it’s a constitutional thing; it’s a state sovereignty thing; it’s a county government thing,” Bundy said.

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