Las Vegas Sun

December 18, 2014

Currently: 52° — Complete forecast | Log in | Create an account

Las Vegas slot cheat may be headed for Nevada’s Black Book

Image

Steve Marcus

A Black Book, a State Gaming Control Board list of people excluded from Nevada casinos, is displayed at the Mob Museum in downtown Las Vegas Monday, Feb. 13, 2012. At right is a page on former mobster Tony “The Ant” Spilotro, who was removed from the book only after his death.

A Las Vegas man convicted of trying to rig slot machines with an electronic device may soon find himself in Nevada’s Black Book and barred from entering casinos.

The state Gaming Control Board on Thursday nominated Larry Keith Green to be included in the list of persons who are excluded from gambling businesses.

Deputy Attorney General John Michela told the board in Las Vegas that Green, 63, has three prior convictions in Nevada and one in Missouri on gaming violations.

Green is currently on a five-year probation placed on him in April 2012 and ordered by the judge not to appear in casinos.

Among other things, Michela said Green is a “notorious and unsavory” person and his presence in a casino is a threat to the state and the casino industry.

Green did not appear at the hearing but Michela said he had been notified. He will have a chance to show up at the meeting of the state Gaming Commission, which will make the final decision whether to place his name in the Black Book.

The gaming board has already nominated his partner Roderick W Dee II for the list of excluded persons.

Missouri in 2012 added both of their names to the list of excluded persons in that state.

They were convicted in that state in Clay County of using an electronic device to manipulate slot machines out of thousands of dollars.

The Black Book has the names of 32 men and one woman. Dee and Green are the first two nominees since 2009.

It was originally started in 1972 to keep mobsters and those with ties to the underworld out of Nevada’s gambling halls or to have any hidden ownerships in them.

But in recent years it has mostly been used to bar cheaters from entering casinos.

Join the Discussion:

Check this out for a full explanation of our conversion to the LiveFyre commenting system and instructions on how to sign up for an account.

Full comments policy

Previous Discussion: comment so far…

Comments are moderated by Las Vegas Sun editors. Our goal is not to limit the discussion, but rather to elevate it. Comments should be relevant and contain no abusive language. Comments that are off-topic, vulgar, profane or include personal attacks will be removed. Full comments policy. Additionally, we now display comments from trusted commenters by default. Those wishing to become a trusted commenter need to verify their identity or sign in with Facebook Connect to tie their Facebook account to their Las Vegas Sun account. For more on this change, read our story about how it works and why we did it.

Only trusted comments are displayed on this page. Untrusted comments have expired from this story.

No trusted comments have been posted.