Las Vegas Sun

September 21, 2014

Currently: 75° — Complete forecast | Log in | Create an account

Las Vegas clinic named in Michael Jackson wrongful death lawsuit

Image

AP Photo/Isaac Brekken

Dr. Conrad Murray, a physician for the late pop star Michael Jackson, appears at a child support hearing at Clark County Family Court, Monday, Nov. 16, 2009, in Las Vegas.

Michael Jackson's father filed a wrongful death lawsuit Friday against the doctor charged with giving the pop superstar a lethal dose of sedatives one year ago, accusing the Nevada doctor of negligence, secrecy and poor training.

Joe Jackson sued Dr. Conrad Murray on Friday -- the anniversary of Michael Jackson's death -- in federal court in Los Angeles. The suit also names Murray's Las Vegas clinic.

The complaint, which seeks more than $75,000, accuses Murray of professional negligence for providing the singer with a mix of sedatives -- including the anesthetic propofol -- that authorities say killed him.

Propofol is normally administered only in hospital settings, but Murray had been providing Jackson the drug in the bedroom of the singer's rented mansion in Los Angeles. Joe Jackson contends the physician tried to conceal his administration of the drug after Jackson's death.

The lawsuit also names medical clinics that Murray operates in Las Vegas and Houston, claiming they did not properly train or supervise the doctor. The lawsuit was filed in federal court because Murray's clinics are in other states and the doctor lives in Nevada.

Murray has pleaded not guilty to an involuntary manslaughter charge filed in February. His attorneys have said that he did not give Jackson anything that "should have" killed him.

Murray's spokeswoman, Miranda Sevcik, said Friday she could not comment until the doctor's attorneys have a chance to review the lawsuit.

Also Friday, a court official in Nevada approved what a prosecutor called a reprieve of efforts to revoke Murray's medical license in that state.

Prosecutor Gerard Costantian said Murray's attorneys paid about $5,000 toward Murray's $15,000 back child support obligation, and the rest will be paid in coming months. Murray lawyer Kristine Brewer said later the money came from an anonymous benefactor whose name she didn't know.

Murray owes the money to the mother of his 12-year-old son in California. He didn't have to appear in court Friday. Nevada law allows for the suspension of professional licenses for nonpayment of child support.

Joe Jackson's lawsuit claims Murray repeatedly lied to paramedics and doctors about giving Jackson propofol. Using hospital records obtained earlier this year, the lawsuit claims Murray told an emergency room doctor that he had only provided Jackson two medications, Valium and Flomax.

It also claims the doctor changed his story to police. Murray's attorneys have said detectives misinterpreted parts of Murray's statements, and their official timeline differs from what he says happened.

The lawsuit faults Murray for not keeping adequate medical records. It also says Murray used his clinics in Nevada and Texas to obtain drugs that were then given to Michael Jackson.

The Jackson family patriarch is seeking damages for a variety of issues, including loss of income and support, emotional distress, and pain and suffering.

It is unclear what money, if any, he'll be able to collect if he wins. Even before Jackson's death, Murray faced mounting debts and adverse judgments in several courts for unpaid bills and child support. His $150,000 a month contract to be Jackson's personal physician while the singer performed in a series of comeback London concerts was never signed, and his attorneys have said he is barely hanging on financially.

The complaint leaves the door open to additional defendants being added.

"Mr. Jackson believes there are other parties responsible for Michael Jackson's death, but has not yet gathered sufficient information regarding their potential liability or responsibility," the complaint states.

Jackson has filed a complaint against concert promoter AEG Live with the California Medical Board, alleging it was engaged in the illegal practice of medicine by allegedly guiding Murray's treatments of the singer.

Join the Discussion:

Check this out for a full explanation of our conversion to the LiveFyre commenting system and instructions on how to sign up for an account.

Full comments policy