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August 1, 2014

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Voter-approved measure may bring L.A.-based porn producers to Las Vegas

A new voter-approved law requiring Southern California porn performers to wear condoms while filming sex scenes could be a boon for the adult film industry in Las Vegas.

On Tuesday, voters in Los Angeles County — which includes the San Fernando Valley, the center of the adult film industry — approved Measure B by a 12-point margin. The measure requires film producers to obtain permits from the county Department of Health and to ensure performers wear condoms during sex scenes.

The adult film industry fiercely opposed the proposal, arguing consumers weren’t interested in watching sex scenes with condoms and that testing policies already in place effectively prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

The industry also has threatened to move elsewhere if the condom requirement is enforced.

“It’s fair to say that many production companies are closely looking at shifting production out of Los Angeles County right now,” said James Lee, spokesman for the No on Government Waste Committee, which opposed the measure.

Lee was quick to warn that a move was not imminent. Already, a legal challenge to the new measure is being planned and details of how the law will be enforced still are being sorted out.

The Free Speech Coalition, a trade association for the adult entertainment industry, scheduled a daylong “summit” Thursday in Hollywood to discuss the latest developments regarding Measure B.

If the measure stands, requiring actors to wear condoms would put Los Angeles-based adult-film companies at a disadvantage, Lee said, prompting them to look elsewhere, including Las Vegas.

“I think Las Vegas already has a history with the adult entertainment industry and it has close proximity to where they’re already based in Los Angeles,” he said. “Any consideration of alternatives of where to move is going to have to include Las Vegas.”

Steven Hirsch, founder of the adult-oriented Vivid Entertainment Group, told Bloomberg News that he expected some producers to begin filming in Las Vegas, which already is home to several porn production companies, including industry heavyweight Brazzers, and scenes are regularly shot throughout the valley.

Las Vegas offers a number of appealing benefits to companies looking to relocate, including cheap real estate, less regulation and a sex-friendly culture, said attorney Clyde Dewitt, who represents porn production companies and has offices in Los Angeles and Las Vegas.

“If you compare the business environment in Las Vegas to the one in Los Angeles, it’s so much more favorable in Las Vegas,” he said. “Companies are already shooting in Las Vegas. They do it all the time.”

Supporters of Measure B, led by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, argued the measure would help stop the spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

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  1. I love this idea....please happen.

  2. Ya just gotta love it don't ya? Up the Taxes on an industry that has made California, make them wear a condom...oh, move to Vegas. Who is the "inspector"?

  3. I am very surprised this initiative passed. Why does the average "Joe" really care what this industry does? Sure it is all about safer sex, but the industry already has a half way decent record of preventing the spread of disease.

    I think this was a wink-wink way of getting this undesirable business out of Los Angeles without explicitly banning it. Unfortunately, if these companies insist on continuing to film in LA, the taxpayer will be forced to pony up the bill for inspectors and more bureaucrats. Either way, this is a losing situation for the county and one that they should've just left alone.

  4. O.K. I hope this doesn't get removed but here goes, See if you think this is funny on the way the story was written.
    1.12-point margin
    2.Lee was quick
    3.are already shooting in Las Vegas.
    4.They do it all the time.

  5. It's not Las Vegas' problem that California has become very business unfriendly! The lawmakers there just want to appease the lowlifes who depend on the out of control social programs in that state!

  6. For those going nuts that the "government" is intruding on this issue need to learn to read.

    This was a voter-approved law. Your brothers and sisters in common are the ones stepping into the personal issues of others here.

    They have been filming in Vegas for over 20 years now. The people of California just gave this industry more reasons to move out of their fine state and build their industry elsewhere.

  7. "For those going nuts that the "government" is intruding on this issue need to learn to read. This was a voter-approved law. Your brothers and sisters in common are the ones stepping into the personal issues of others here."

    vegaslee -- just because voters approved it doesn't mean for a second it's not government intrusion. Otherwise Jim Crow would still be the law of the land and the religious right would dominate with their notion America must be ruled by biblical principles. You know, a theocracy. As for who's not reading, I suggest you begin with the Bill of Rights. That new law could very well invoke privacy and freedom of contract rights.

    "Where rights secured by the Constitution are involved, there can be no rulemaking or legislation which would abrogate them." -- Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436, 491 (1966)

  8. Just Groovy!

  9. I think the govt should stay out of people's sex lives, whether there are cameras present or not. I see this one getting struck down by the courts.

  10. Heeyyyyyy, why not porn ? We have the smut peddlers that the County Comissioners can't seem to get off the sidewalks on the strip, maybe they can shoot porn on the sidewalks too.